How to Clean Drip Pans Naturally

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Are you wondering how to clean drip pans without smelly chemicals that’ll burn your nose hairs off? I was too. So, I decided it was time to use my go-to cleaning products in an attempt to tackle cleaning stove drip pans on my well-loved (code for lots of boiled-over pots) stove.

How to clean drip pans naturally. Quick and easy method.

As you can see in the after photo, the drip pans don’t look completely brilliant and perfect after cleaning. I’m okay with the result. I wasn’t after perfection – just clean drip pans that didn’t involve giving myself a dizzying headache to achieve the end result.

I’m a bit of a worrier – so I know if I used anything stronger, I would’ve worried about being blown to pieces once I turned the stove on. So, a good old fashioned scrub down with dish soap and baking soda was in order. I’m always surprised at how many household messes this simple combination can address.

How to Clean Drip Pans Naturally

Now, this isn’t a set-it-and-forget it method of cleaning stove drip pans. You’re going to have to put some elbow grease into this. Not much. Just enough to get most of the gunk out. Oh man was it gunky. I’m actually slightly embarrassed to show you this. But, I guess I’ll take one for the team just this time. Promise not to judge too harshly?

Here is the hot mess that resides beneath my burners. I’d love to say that I “let it get really bad for the purpose of this blog post” but I can’t. This is the real-life stove of someone that cooks virtually every meal at home.

How to clean drip pans naturally. Quick and easy method.

Here’s the Step by Step Process

Step 1:

Remove burners, lift out the drip pans and shake them into the sink or into a garbage bag to get rid of any loose gunk.

Step 2:

How to clean drip pans naturally. Quick and easy method.

Spray down the stove drip pans. You’ll be surprised at just how much gunk a strong steam of water can remove on its own. It helps if your faucet has a powerful spray so you can get all up into that drip pans face to blast the gunk away.

Step 3:

How to clean drip pans naturally. Quick and easy method.

Combine dish soap and baking soda in a 1:1 ratio in a small bowl. Mix together until it creates a frosting-like consistency with a slightly foamy texture. Here’s what you should see when you have everything all mixed up.

Step 4:

How to clean drip pans naturally. Quick and easy method.

Apply the mixture to your drip pans generously. When I say generously, I mean slathered. Don’t be shy about this. Then, give it a scrub down for a few seconds to loosen things up. I scrubbed for 30 seconds or so on the ones that were in especially bad shape.

Step 5:

How to clean drip pans naturally. Quick and easy method.

Transfer the drip pans to Ziploc bags so they’re out of the way and aren’t soaping up your counters. Let them sit for an hour or more. If you don’t want to waste “good” bags on this, just use the plastic bags your groceries are bagged in. Actually, I should’ve done that myself but didn’t think of it until right now.

There’s no better time than now to lift up that “hood” and clean whatever this thing is called. Again, a little soap and water does the job just fine.

How to clean drip pans naturally. Quick and easy method.

Step 6:

Remove from bags and scrub away. I didn’t get a picture of this step, but here’s the result.

How to Clean Drip Pans

Note: I scrubbed with a crocheted dish scrubbie. You will have way better results using the tough side of a regular dish sponge.

I’m happy with the results. They aren’t in like new condition but don’t you agree that the after looks much better than the before? Huge improvement in my eyes. So, if you’re looking for an easy and natural method of learning how to clean clean your drip pans, I highly recommend you give this a try. If you want more easy cleaning tips, check out how I clean the kitchen in 15 minutes or less.

Comments

  1. 4

    says

    Ok. This is amazing and I’m probably do this first thing in the morning. How incredible! The stove and I sometimes get mad at each other and go days without speaking because I get so mad it him- er, it for getting so dirty and gross all the time.

  2. 6

    says

    I’m always amazed at what simple products that we have in the kitchen or at home can do. Most of the time we run out and buy something when all we have to do is reach for those good old-fashioned products like baking soda, etc. can do. This looks fabulous. My drip pans definitely need cleaning.

  3. 8

    says

    I used to just leave them until they where really bad (and had to use oven cleaner on them…) but now I find that I can be super lazy, whenever I use the stove (I love my crock pot…) I just put them in the dishwasher. Takes no time and my stove always looks clean…

  4. 10

    Anonymous says

    I have a sealed top gas stove with unsightly brown “cooking stains”. Not food stains, just cooking stains. I wonder if this would help those? If I use a scouring pad/scrubber it will scratch the paint finish.

  5. 14

    Anonymous says

    To Anonymous above, try Bon Ami. It’s a powder like Ajax, but is made to prevent scratching. I haven’t tried it on metal, but it’s great on my ceramic dishes – 40 years old and look (almost) like new.

  6. 15

    says

    Well, starting this afternoon, I’ll be using the method that you described and also using it for the few spots on the inside of the oven. I was never satisfied with how the dishwasher didn’t work even though I’d scrubbed them as thoroughly as possible before putting them in the dishwasher. I didn’t try oven cleaner on the drip pans because they seemed like the kind of metal that the oven cleaner warned you not to use it on – I’ll want to kick myself if I find out that I could have actually used that oven cleaner on the drip pans at the same time I was cleaning the oven! Ha ha! However, I haven’t used the typical oven cleaner for years and years because it seems so lethal and I’ve been battling health problems for decades. Now, for the past 9 years, the service dog that I have is allergic to the world and can be very sensitive to some odors, chemicals, and a lot of environmental factors so I’m very careful what I expose her to. She is a Staffordshire Bull Terrier (commonly called pit bull) Phoebe, she takes care of me 24/7 by herself, is my best friend and I trust her with my very life so it’s very important that I do whatever I can to create a safe and comfortable environment for her, also. Most recently, I’d been cleaning such messes with a mix of vinegar and baking soda and I’ve been rather pleased with those results. For just the last couple of weeks, I’ve been incorporating hydrogen peroxide into my cleaning routines (especially laundry, soaking kitchen scrubbers, combs, hair brushes & toothbrushes). I really like the fresh smell and brightness of my laundry and I do like the way that it cleans, but I don’t know that I’d be comfortable using it if I still had kids in the home – or even other people who don’t listen well. As it is, I only have a personal care giver who comes in and helps me with housekeeping, laundry, some shopping, some cooking, etc. or more correctly, does those things while I get the extra sleep that I need, & she’s so very careful and conscientious that even though she could always have an accident, that would be no different than what could happen to me! Thanks for providing such a great site for us to use!

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